◎ JADH2016

Sep 12-14, 2016 The University of Tokyo






September 12, 2016 (Day 0) 15:00-18:00
JADH2016 Pre-conference symposium

The Humanities, the Liberal Arts and the University in a Digital World

Peter K. Bol
Harvard University, USA

Abstract

What is the role of the humanities in education and why are the humanities central to the liberal arts? The job of the humanities is to remember our past, both its best and its worst, when it is easier to forget; to push us reflect on ourselves and question our present when it is easier to go along. Above all else, the humanities continue our predecessors’ efforts to create and sustain civilization. They remind us that, as Confucius said, “Learning without thinking is to deceive oneself; thinking without learning is to endanger oneself 學而不思則罔, 思而不學則殆 .” When learning is treated as acquiring skills employers can use and thinking is reduced to following simplistic ideologies, the humanities offer the antidote.

The digital world gives the humanities new possibilities to help us learn, reflect, and create. Its tools allow us to see more, to think more clearly, and to communicate across cultures. We need to consider how the humanities can embrace these tools and skills without losing sight of its mission and without forgetting its past.

Biography

Peter K. Bol is the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning and the Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. As Vice Provost (named in 2013/09) he is responsible for HarvardX, the Harvard Initiative in Learning and Teaching, and research that connects online and residential learning. Together with William Kirby he teaches ChinaX (SW12x) course, one of the HarvardX courses. His research is centered on the history of China’s cultural elites at the national and local levels from the 7th to the 17th century. He is the author of "This Culture of Ours": Intellectual Transitions in T'ang and Sung China, Neo-Confucianism in History, coauthor of Sung Dynasty Uses of the I-ching, co-editor of Ways with Words, and various journal articles in Chinese, Japanese, and English. He led Harvard’s university-wide effort to establish support for geospatial analysis in teaching and research; in 2005 he was named the first director of the Center for Geographic Analysis. He also directs the China Historical Geographic Information Systems project, a collaboration between Harvard and Fudan University in Shanghai to create a GIS for 2000 years of Chinese history. In a collaboration between Harvard, Academia Sinica, and Peking University he directs the China Biographical Database project, an online relational database currently of 360,000 historical figures that is being expanded to include all biographical data in China's historical record over the last 2000 years.

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September 12, 2016 (Day 0) 15:00-18:00
JADH2016 Pre-conference symposium

学術資産とデジタルアーカイブ
Academic Assets and Digital Archives

久留島典子  Noriko Kurushima
東京大学  The University of Tokyo, Japan

Abstract

Biography

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September 12, 2016 (Day 0) 15:00-18:00
JADH2016 Pre-conference symposium

描かれた都市の暮らしをDBに―16世紀の洛中洛外図屏風人物データベース―
Making Database of City Life from Genre Paintings - Persons' Database of 16th Century Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (Scenes In and Around Kyoto Screens)

小島道裕  Michihiro Kojima
国立歴史民俗博物館  National Museum of Japanese History, Japan

Abstract

Biography

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September 13, 2016 (Day 1) 14:20-15:20
Keynote Lecture

Credit where credit is due: how digital scholarship is changing history in the English-speaking world and what the American Historical Association is doing about it

Seth Denbo, Ph.D.
American Historical Association, USA
sdenbo@historians.org

Abstract

“The context of historical scholarship is changing rapidly and profoundly.” With these words the American Historical Association launched its intervention into the problem of evaluating digital scholarship by historians.
As historians, we are conducting our scholarship (research, teaching, writing, publishing) in a world that is changing rapidly. In every stage of historical research the digital context of our work is transforming what we do. Teaching is also being refigured by the use of digital tools and methods. These methodologies are no longer the preserve of a small minority of digitally-trained historians. Even scholars with limited technological skills use the web for finding primary and secondary sources, doing basic computational analyses, and even publishing online. The use of digital technologies gives us new ways to approach our traditional questions, provides more varied forms of expressing ideas, and allows us to reach new audiences.
While the conduct of our historical work has changed in many ways, we lag behind in evaluating scholarship using non-traditional methods. Disciplinary imperatives limit forms of acceptable publication to traditional outputs—journal articles and books. The peer review that underpins the entire process of scholarly publication often does not occur when work is published online. Lacking peer review mechanisms, many departments are reluctant to open their requirements for tenure and promotion to these new approaches and formats.
Developments in digital history are changing what we can express about the past. I will explore how through looking at some exemplary uses of these approaches in the English-speaking academic world. Digital history is not a new phenomenon. Economic and social historians realized the power of computational tools for analyzing large-scale data as long ago as the 1970s. This work suffered from making promises that were impossible to deliver on, and was overtaken by a cultural and linguistic turn in the wider discipline of history. But it provided a foundation for conceptualizing how large-scale data sets covering broad swathes of historical time could become an important methodological approach for our discipline.
Today the work of digital historians is much more varied and immersed in existing paradigms. It is more of a set of lenses for viewing sources than a separate field within our discipline, but those lenses are highly varied. Some provide very close and detailed interpretations of a small number of sources, while others look at vast amounts of data to paint a picture of change over time. Other approaches are primarily about historical education, both in and out of the classroom. In looking at these projects my paper will examine how they contribute to the scholarly conversation in their field, explore some of the challenges they present to traditional modes of scholarship, and discuss issues related to evaluating them for professional credit.

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September 14, 2016 (Day 2) 11:20-12:50
Plenary panel session1

Three Databases on Japanese History and Culture: an Editing Experience

Charlotte Von Verschuer
École Pratique des Hautes Études

Abstract

I will present three internet databases related to Japanese history and culture that I have co-edited and co-authored.

1. Online Glossary of Japanese Historical Terms 日本史グロッサリー・データベース or: On-line Glossary of Japanese Historical Terms 応答型翻訳支援システム .
The Online Glossary of Premodern Japanese Historical Terms is one of the sub-projects of the Japan Memory Project (JMP), designed and created with the support of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (COE, 2000 – 2004), the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, 2005-2008) and a number of foreign scholars.
Project Director: Ishigami Eichi, Director of the Japan Memory Project (2000-2008);
Members of the Advisory Committee:
Martin Collcutt (Princeton University), Kate Wildman Nakai (Sophia University), Joan Piggott (University of Southern California), Detlev Taranczewski (Universität Bonn), Ronald P. Toby (University of Illinois, Urbana Champagne), Hitomi Tonomura (University of Michigan), Charlotte von Verschuer(École Pratiques des Hautes Études), Willy Vande Walle(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. All other Project members, Editorial staff, and Editorial assistants are listed on the site.
The purpose of this glossary is to select and list major existing translations for Japanese historical terms and to make them available over the internet as a tool for assisting in the translation of Japanese primary sources. The glossary consists of more than 25,000 entries. Instead of giving set translations or any English standard terms, the glossary, as a special feature, provides a variety of translations for the same technical term and gives, for each translation, the author name and publication. The glossary is drawing these translations from over 70 works written in English, French, and German.

2. Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan / Dictionnaire des sources du Japon classique
欧文日本古代史料解題データベース (Online Draft Version" December 2004)

Book Version: Dictionnaire des sources du Japon classique/Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan, Paris: College de France, 2006; distribution: De Boccard: http://www.deboccard.com/
Editors: Joan Piggott, University of Southern California
Ineke Van Put, Catholic University of Leuven
Ivo Smits, Leiden University
Charlotte von Verschuer, École Pratiques des Hautes Études
Michel Vieillard-Baron, Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (INALCO)
Co-editors: Ishigami Eiichi, Historiographical Institute, The University of Tokyo (Shiryô Hensanjo)
Yoshida Sanae, Historiographical Institute, The University of Tokyo (Shiryô Hensanjo)
Horikawa Takashi, National Institute of Japanese Literature (NIJL; Kokubungaku Kenkyû Shiryôkan) / Tsurumi University
Advisors: Araki Toshio, Senshû University
Sano Midori, Gakushuin University
Brian Ruppert, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Tabuchi Kumiko, National Institute of Japanese Literature (NIJL; Kokubungaku Kenkyû Shiryôkan)
Kikuchi Hiroki, Historiographical Institute, The University of Tokyo (Shiryô Hensanjo)

Collaboration: National Institute of Japanese Literature (NIJL; Kokubungaku Kenkyû Shiryôkan); Centre de recherches sur les Civilisations chinoise, japonaise et tibetaine (UMR-CNRS, EPHE, College de France, Universite de Paris 7)

Support:
- Japan Memory Project (JMP) at the Historiographical Institute, The University of Tokyo (Shiryô Hensanjo)
- École Pratique des Hautes Études (EPHE), Section des Sciences Historiques et Philologiques,

3.
Traditional Agricultural Techniques: A Glossary in French-English-Chinese-Japanese (Grains and Horticulture) Preliminary Version 2013
農業技術用語集:仏・英・中・日(穀類)2013年暫定版(インターネット・データベース)
http://labour.crcao.fr

New Title (November 2016):
Dictionary of Traditional Agriculture: English-French-Chinese-Japanese
Dictionnaire de l’agriculture traditionnelle: français-anglais-chinois-japonais 法英汉日传统农业辞典
伝統農業技術:英日中仏用語辞典

Editors (2016): Cozette Griffin-Kremer (Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers CNAM), Guoqiang Li (Paris West University), Perrine Mane (Centre National de Recherches Scienfiques CNRS), Charlotte von Verschuer (EPHE)

Authors: Yoshio Abe (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales EHESS), Carolina Carpinschi, Cozette Griffin-Kremer, Guoqiang Li, Perrine Mane, Francois Sigaut (EHESS, CNAM), Eric Trombert (CNRS), Charlotte von Verschuer

Advisors: Michiaki Kono (Kanagawa University, Yokohama), Takeshi Watabe (Tokai University, Tokyo), Yin Shaoting (Yunnan University, China)

Webmaster: Philippe Pons (EPHE)

Technical Management: Elise Lemardelée (EPHE), Yves Cadot (Université de Toulouse)

Publisher: East Asian Civilisations Research Centre (CRCAO: EPHE, CNRS, Université Paris- Diderot, College de France)

Date of publication: 2009, 2013, 2016

Collaboration: Research Group on the Comparative History of Agricultural Technology

Support: Fondation pour l’étude de la langue et de la civilisation japonaises (Fondation de France), Paris; Fukushima Prefectural Museum, Japan; China Agricultural Museum, Beijing; Institute of Botany (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Beijing, China.
• In contrast to a dictionary, this glossary is not meant to be exhaustive. It provides a selection of technical terms, deliberately excluding most generic terms. The glossary emphasizes technical specifics. We hope that it will enable users to avoid some common errors of translation by refining the meanings given for equivalent items.
• With the exception of words noted as older (ANC.), the terms listed are contemporary.
• The glossary covers traditional agricultural techniques, as they were practiced around the world up to this day. Terms that arose after industrialization have been excluded. (For these terms, the user can refer to industrial machine and product catalogues.)
• This glossary can contribute to safeguarding a wealth of technical information and knowledge about biodiversity, potentials for food production and wise utilization of resources and energy.
• The glossary highlights cultural differences: many technical terms have no equivalent in another cultural area. (The symbol @ attached to a word means that the term is specific to a particular language.)
• The entries are arranged by thematic category, so a search can be carried out either by word or by thematic category. Each entry has a window in which users can enter their own comments.
The Contents:
The Dictionary contains technical terms of agricultural traditions in a thematic arrangement. Many terms are documented by pictures. The Draft Version published in 2013 comprises the techniques of grain cultivation, vegetable and fruit agriculture, providing terms for agricultural operations and tools. The Dictionary is arranged in eleven thematic categories with a total of about ten thousand entries, covering: Tillage, Water Management, Soil Improvement, Sowing, Harvesting, Threshing-Degraining, Cereal Grains, Fruit and Vegetables, Plant Morphology, Fields and Systems, and Horticulture. The parallel presentation of English, French, Chinese and Japanese terms will shed light on the technical and cultural differences between the various linguistic areas. The Dictionary comprises the basic techniques, both traditional and contemporary. It does however not include the variants that involve the use of fuel, of chemicals, and of biotechnology, as these terms can be found on commercial catalogues. The project espouses the need to protect natural resources and preserve rural cultural heritage.

Perspective:
In an age of concern over saving the environment and bio-diversity, it seems timely to provide information about agricultural techniques that support this aim. In light of the high stakes involved in climate change, economic globalization and the industrialization of agriculture, traditional agricultural techniques deserve to be considered as a universal asset of humankind. The Dictionary has first been launched on-line in 2009. It is continuously expanding and will cover fields other than grains, vegetable and fruit agriculture, such as cattle husbandry, viticulture, sylviculture etc.
Aim: With the world wide concern for global Food Security, research on agricultural techniques is progressing in European countries as well as in China and Japan. It is time to provide a working tool for translations and international communication. It goes without saying that the general language dictionaries do not provide precise enough information in the field. The Dictionary should be used for translating technical works and catalogues. The Dictionary will enhance the study of environmental ecology and be the safeguard of rural heritage. It should promote research and fieldwork by graduate students and curators and, last but not least, it encourages a dialogue among the specialists of various countries.

Biography

Charlotte von Verschuer is Professor of Japanese history at École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris. Born in Bonn, Germany, she did her school education in Brussels at the European School, in Belgium. She then studied Japanese at the International Christian University in Tokyo, Japanese and Chinese languages, as well as Asian art history at Bonn University in Germany, and graduated in Japanese studies at the Institut National de Langues Orientales (INALCO University) in Paris. Thereafter she spent two years as a Japanese Government scholarship fellow at the Institute of History (Kokushi kenkyushitsu) at The Tokyo University under the guidance of Tsuchida Naoshige with his Ishii Masatoshi, and also spent eight months as a trainee at the Taiwan Palace Museum in Taibei, and continued her Ph.D. studies in Paris, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (EPHE) under the guidance of Francine Herail. She received her Ph.D. in Oriental Studies at INALCO University with her thesis on ‘8th-9th Century Official Relations between Japan and China’, and an other Ph.D. in History at Paris EPHE with her thesis on ‘The Economy of Ancient Japan’. She was associate researcher at Centre National de Recherches Scientifiques (CNRS) before becoming Professor of Ancient and Medieval History of Japan at EPHE in 1995, at the East Asian Civilisations Research Centre (CRCAO). Her publications in French, German, English, and Japanese include: - Across the Perilous Sea: Japanese Trade with China and Korea from the seventh to sixteenth Centuries, translated from French by Kristen Lee Hunter, Ithaca (New York), Cornell University Press, 2006; and - Rice, Agriculture, and the Food Supply in Premodern Japan, translated and edited by Wendy Cobcroft, London, Needham Research Institute Monograph Series, London, New York, Routledge, 2016.

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September 14, 2016 (Day 2) 11:20-12:50
Plenary panel session1

Intellectual Networks in Tokugawa Japan: the beginnings of the Edo Japan Database

Bettina Gramlich-Oka, Ph.D.
Sophia University

Abstract

The project is a historical network analysis of the Tokugawa period (1600–1868). Our principal actor is the scholar Rai Shunsui (1746–1816) and his many records. Shunsui’s diary, spanning over thirty-five years, his correspondence, and many other records are rich in information regarding the wide intellectual network that Shunsui nurtured and that extended all over Japan.
The project offers thus a novel approach in that it is not simply an intellectual biography but grounded in the notion that intellectual interactions among scholars of the Tokugawa period are much better described by the analogy of a network. Their correspondence, meetings and sharing of objects and manuscripts will help us to understand better the actual working of the various levels of state administration, in which the scholars were involved. Therefore, intra-territorial and inter-territorial networks are keys to understanding how political reforms were discussed and implemented in Tokugawa Japan. In more concrete terms, this project will investigate the network of Rai Shunsui in order to document the intellectual environment of the late Tokugawa reforms in time and space by setting up a geo-database (GIS) containing the data collected from a broad variety of sources.

Biography

Bettina GRAMLICH-OKA holds a Ph.D. (University of Tübingen, Germany) in Japanese history.
She is a professor for Japanese history at Sophia University, Tokyo, where she teaches courses in women history, Edo society, and upper level courses implementing “reacting to the past” pedagogy. Her main publications are Thinking Like a Man: Tadano Makuzu (Brill, 2006; in Japanese 2013), Economic Thought in Early Modern Japan (Brill, 2010; in Japanese 2013), and is currently working on intellectual networks, marriage and adoption practices in the Edo period. In 2014 she became the editor and since 2016 the Chief Editor of Monumenta Nipponica. Since 2010, she is the leader of the research unit “Network Studies” in the Institute of Comparative Culture of Sophia University (network-studies.org). Part of the project is the development of the relational database introduced here.

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September 14, 2016 (Day 2) 16:10-17:40
Plenary panel session2

Future of East Asian Digital Humanities

Jieh Hsiang
National Taiwan University

Masahiro Shimoda
The University of Tokyo

Ray Siemens
University of Victoria

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